Editing games is cool

ever played a game that was awesome… except for that one tiny little thing? …

my favorite thing about arduboy… now you can change it

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I don’t understand?? O_O

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ehrm, with nothing but open source games, if there is something you dont like in a game, its generaly prety simple to change it

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Oh, yeah, that’s definitely one cool up-side of the Arduboy. :slight_smile: It can also help learn how games are programmed.

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ya ive learned a ton

first thing i learned c is a pain

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C/C++ might be frustrating, but if you stick with it you’ll be rewarded because the syntax is reused by other languages. Java, C# and PHP are a few that come to mind.

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Php I’m familiar with or was remembering bits of php has made much easier

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The scope rules for PHP are confusing for someone used to C/C++.

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C++ is confusing to someone used to php aswell but php is fairly simple to learn and once you know your way around a language learning another is fairly simple

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The C language family (C/C++/PHP/PERL/Java/JavaScript/…) can be really confusing to switch between. But at least they all have different names, as opposed to the BASIC family.

I wouldn’t even class those languages as being in the same ‘family’.
They use curly braces and similar function syntax, but that’s where the similarities end and the differences begin.

Some use sigils, some are incredibly verbose, some have a preprocessor, some are dynamic, some are static, some are duck-typed etc.
(I have used all 6 at least once.)

I’d like to forget PHP, getting an unexpected 'T_PAAMAYIM_NEKUDOTAYIM' error is not fun.

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Or a single ’ out of place making. 1000 lines of code act funny or better yet when it works for the wrong reason leaving serious security issues

Sort of depends on how you define “family”. I tend to look at what languages the creators credit with having contributed features. PERL specifically drew features from C, and PHP from Perl, so they are in that sense part of the C family. I believe JavaScript also got syntax from C, for much the same reason Java did - to make it easier for people to learn them (i.e - the reason for learning C cited above). On the other end, you could define family as “being so similar that programs routinely work in both languages”. In that sense, C and C++ are about the extend of the C family.

But this is more a comment on BASIC. Things calling themselves “FOO BASIC” vary about as much as the C-like languages I listed.

Personally I really like C and find it very easy to program in. Like someone else said, it is also a language that a lot of other languages are based on, so knowing C can help learning other languages (e.g. javascript is almost identical).

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Personally, I think C is at best OK as a high level assembler. The backwards type declarations (C is the only language I know of whose expert users wrote a tool to help deal with declaration syntax!) is really it’s only major flaw But even when it was created, there were languages with features that made programming easier, though they weren’t suited for that high level assember role. In the half century since then there have been a lot of innovations in programming languages that make programming a lot easier, though few of them have made it into languages suitable for that role

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After getting started in QBASIC, my first exposure to C was in writing mods for Quake. One was a railgun, another (my favorite) replaced the axe with a fish on a stick. When you pressed attack it would launch a bouncing bloody fish that would flop around and then explode.

Also made some mods for Unreal, Quake 2 and Max Payne before accidentally formatting the wrong hard drive. That’s a lesson you don’t soon forget.

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I dont like to classify languages into a family as there are no clear lines drawn of where C++ becomes C becomes C# becomes Java becomes Javascript and soforth.

I like to classify languages in a pyramid, as you go higher, you gain general functionality and lose readability and if you go lower, you lose general functionality and gain readability, sure there are outliers (like python and the smourgous board of libraries there are than can get the job done everywhere), but most langs fit into this heirarchy.

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To be honest I doubt any known diagram or structure could sufficiently do language relationships justice.

A venn diagram of features would have to be rendered in multiple dimensions or as sub-sections of the whole diagram to be anywhere near viewable, and a spider-diagram (or what mathematicians would term a ‘graph’) would soon have too many connections to be viewable.

That’s probably why people tend to just stick to paradigm and feature lists.

I think C++ would fit in multiple places in your hierarchy.
On the one hand it allows inline assembly which is almost as low as you can go, and at the other end it has templates, which can be used for metaprogramming, which is a level of abstraction higher than classes or functors.