[POLL] How did you start learning programming?


(Pharap) #21

To quote Edsger Dijkstra:

The use of COBOL cripples the mind; its teaching should, therefore, be regarded as a criminal offense.

(Sidenote: I had a teacher who used to program in COBOL and consequently I’m inclined to agree with Dijkstra.)


(Scott R) #22

Building a robot army to take over the world is not on your todo list?


(Pharap) #23

Too many things could go wrong. Robots turning on their creator, ecophagic grey goo, blue hedgehogs…


(Molly C) #24

A swarm of pi zeros would be fun if you could buy more than one at a time. :sob:

I imagine an automated drone shield that follows you as you walk.


(Molly C) #25

You make it sound like a bad thing. It is evolution. I for one welcome our robot children overlords. :sweat_smile:


(Mike) #26

Especially if it’s GLOBAL THERMONUCLEAR WAR (said in the voice of our robot children overlords).

But I really liked talk.politics. It’s modern incarnations - twitter and reddit - aren’t as much fun.


(curly) #27

I started with a very broken kings of chaos game clone and fixed it


(Matt) #28

I started with BASIC on the ZX Spectrum in the 1980’s…jeeess im old


(Simon) #30

10 print "hello world"
20 goto 10

16K … boy were you spoilt ! I had a VIC 20 with 5K ram and about half of that was taken by the ‘OS’ and screen RAM.


#31

we had to use masking tape to hold the +8k in, if you bumped it too hard you lost half your ram :smiley:


(Simon) #32

I started on a IBM System 36 - it had 8" disk array (a cassette that held 10 floppys) and a hex keyboard in case the thing wouldn’t start. Never saw punched cards in action, though.


#33

My dad used punch cards, he told me a story of one night him and a friend stayed up all night coding a dirty poem into punch cards and then swapped the cards in for a stack that did graphing or something and was going to be used at a presentation at the University to demonstrate the power of the computer. He said the results were hilarious and it was lucky it never got traced back to him, haha


#34

Started out with my brother’s C64, a giant CRT TV that I sat too close to, and these books! :smiley:





(Amol P) #35

Started learning in the early 90s, with a BASIC book, on a 286 PC :slight_smile: Slowly graduated to coding in C and then C++. It was all in Windows though. Wish I had picked up Linux in those days. This was in Pune, India, entire 90s.


Arduboy Magazine Vol.6
(Kevin) #36

I taught myself how to code QBASIC when I was about 9 years old, not even shitting you my only resource was the help menu. This may explain why I am a terrible programmer.


(Pharap) #37

If you’re feeling nostalgic, QB64 is a pretty good modern Basic tool that compiles the Basic rather than just interpreting it. They’ve got a good Wiki too.
It was also my first experience with writing Basic (unless you count Visual Basic, which I don’t).


(Mike) #38

Linux back in the early 90s wasn’t a pretty sight. The first distro’s didn’t show up until '93, and they didn’t have the easy installers and package managers we know and love/hate today. I recall a tech writer of the time comparing it to a tank kit. Great fun once you got it assembled.

BSD was in a little better shape, but only a little. FreeBSD at least had the ports system (which is why decided to run it instead of Linux). Then AT&T sued the principle authors for copyright violation, and it never recovered.


(Mr Y) #39

Sadly I can code only in BASIC (and very crappy, I might add). Also - nothing really interactive (so unfortunately games are out of the question, hehe).
So finally I stayed with music and occasionally some graphic.

Anywayz. In 80s and early 90s the best source of… the code’s sources :slight_smile: to check out / analyse / learn - were books about BASIC. Hence my choice in this poll - books.

But later, in the second half of 90s - the friends from Internet were very helpful too.


(cyril guichard) #40

ZX81 for me, then Amstrad CPC 464, and then Commodore, Atari, Amiga and ultimately PC.


#41

Here are my first computer and programming book.

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