Team ARG disappeared- how to get their games?

@Pharap - did you also manage to backup the seriously awesome demos? I only have the SiNe-DeMo, and now I regret not trying out more more sooner.

I have all the demos too, somewhere, tucked away, in a hard drive…

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Yes, all 14 of them.

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I’m slowly making the repos public.

I’m starting with the non-games, particularly the ATMlib stuff since people have been asking about that.

Everything is archived so it’s read-only,
but every repo can still be forked, and the forks will be editable.

I may unarchive things to add a local copy of the images from the website in case the website goes down, but apart from that my intent is to keep everything as it was.


What I don’t have is .hex files and .arduboy files.
Compiling .hex files should be fairly easy,
but recreating the .arduboy files would take some time,
so if anyone’s got any that they’d like to donate,
please let me know, it would save a fair bit of time.


In other news, I designed a logo for the museum,
but adapting it to make a decent digital version would take me quite a while.

TAMLogoAlphaDarkSmall

(I actually designed several, but this is the one I settled on.)

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They had a repo didn’t they with the arduboy files? And the team arg loader? It might still be hosted…

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All 14 are now publicly available:

Only 13 have precompiled releases though.
I had problems compiling DM-09.

I expect it’s just library issues or how things have changed.
I’ll look into it another time though, it’s not high priority.

I don’t think they did.
I would have expected they hosted the .arduboy files in GitHub’s releases.


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Only 5 repos remain private.

One appears to be a clone of YUM YUM, but without any sign of a licence.

One is Sky Knights, which appears to only be compileable for Gamby.
There was mention of an Arduboy version, but I can’t see any evidence of it.
If it was on another branch then it’s lost to time and the only hope is to modify the Gamby version.

One is Strange Land, which seems to compile fine for Arduboy,
but its folder was suffixed _DEV instead of _AB indicating that it was intended to be used on the devkit rather than the Arduboy so I’ll have to check that compiling it isn’t going to create something that’s going to mess up people’s Arduboys because it’s trying to use the pins incorrectly.

And the last two are Block Hop and Elventure which both depend on a library that’s unavailable.
I remember someone asking about this once, particularly with Elventure,
and there’s a fork on my personal GitHub account that has the necessary fixes:

I’ll have to look into what I did to that to get it working and do the same for Block Hop,
but it’ll probably end up in a different repo if I do so.


Those 5 aside, everything’s public and archived.

I’ve started a github pages which I hope to fill in with more information.
For now it’s just got basic information and a handful of links:

All the things I was able to compile now have precompiled .hex files in their releases.

In other words, everything’s pretty much up and running so people can grab the games again as required.

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One of the half finished games on there is a pretty awesome isometric engine.

@bateske I would love for you to host some of the tools in the Arduboy site. Especially the image converter as its referenced in the getting started tutorial that @crait wrote.

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Looks like I was about a month late picking up an Arduboy. It came with Sirene preloaded and I was looking for how to not lose it when I started playing. I’m sorry I never got a chance to thank JO3RI for their work.

While you are archiving, you may want to archive team-arg.org or refer it to archive.org while it is still up. It’s a really well put together webpage and serves as good documentation of the games and tools.

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Looks like it was already archived on October 22nd, 2019.

https://web.archive.org/web/20191022001826/http://www.team-arg.com/

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Here’s a bit of a conundrum:

Some background info

The Arduboy2 library includes the drawCompressed() function for drawing a bitmap that has been compressed using RLE encoding. This function was written by Team A.R.G. and included in their fork of the Arduboy library, then later incorporated into the Arduboy2 library by me. (Shortly afterwards, Team A.R.G. abandoned their modified Arduboy library and ported all their games to the Arduboy2 library.)

On their web site, Team A.R.G. provided source for a command line program, named cabi, to convert a PNG bitmap file to C/C++ source code describing an array that could be passed to drawCompressed(). In the Arduboy2 library documentation for drawCompressed(), I included a link to the Team A.R.G. GitHub repository for cabi but now that this repository has been deleted, the link is broken.

I think the best way for me to fix this is to include the cabi source code under the extras folder of the Arduboy2 library and replace the broken link with a reference to it. This should ensure that this type of problem won’t happen again. I’ll likely make some changes to cabi.c, mainly to eliminate some compiler warnings. I expect I’ll also change some of the documentation.


The cabi source code consists of 3 files: cabi.c, lodepng.c and lodepng.h. The lodepng code is used to read and decode PNG files. It is written by Lode Vandevenne under the zlib licence (included in each file) and a version of the files are included unmodified as part of cabi. This leaves only cabi.c as being a work of Team A.R.G.

The cabi repository, as archived by @Pharap, includes a LICENSE file containing the MIT licence, with:

Copyright (c) 2016 TEAM a.r.g.
Copyright (c) 2016 Zep @lexaloffle

“Zep” is also referenced in the included README.md file:

Arduboy encoder: Monochrome rle encoding by Zep @lexaloffle

However, in the comments in cabi.c:

  • The “title” is abe.c
  • There is no author attribution.
  • There is a line:
    License: CC-0
    (CC0 is a “no copyright” release to the public domain.)

I don’t have the commit history but I’m guessing what happened is initially there wasn’t a LICENSE file but it was added at a later date without anyone examining cabi.c and noting the CC-0 comment. I don’t know the change or author history of file cabi.c

So the question is: Should I:

  1. Replace License: CC-0 in cabi.c with the MIT licence and copyrights (also retaining the same text in the LICENSE file)?
  2. Remove the LICENSE file or have it contain the CC0 licence text?
  3. Leave things as is with a MIT LICENSE file and CC-0 in cabi.c?

Note that if I make any changes and the MIT licence is retained, I’ll add myself as a copyright holder.

Also, in order to make it clearer that lodepng.c and lodepng.h have their own separate licence and author, I think I’d move them to their own subdirectory.

Fortunately the search gods are smiling upon me.
I’ve managed to locate what would have been a fork of Cabi:

(I’ve grabbed a copy with git and may attempt to overwrite my archived version with this version so the commit history can be archived as well.)

This does indeed support the fact that the licence was added later…

Though I think the original CC0 notice was supposed to mean that the RLE compression technique itself was CC0, not cabi, but it’s impossible to be certain and the mention of ‘abe.c’ confuses matters further.

I think the best bet would be to contact Zep/Lexaloffle and see if he can shed some light on the situation.

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Not added; it looks more like an existing CC0 LICENSE file was consciously replaced with the MIT licence.

In light of this new information, I think you’re right. I’d like to know if the licence change was a unilateral decision by @JO3RI or if Zep had some involvement.

Also, as you said, to try to find out what the CC0 licence was intended to apply to. If it applies to the code, then I assume the code would be public domain since the licence was the last thing changed.

Probably just changed it, what is the specific question? I can try to ask him sometimes he responds to me on twitter. He might reply to emails too don’t know :slight_smile:

btw, how much is that domain? (http://team-arg.org/) it would be ideal to point it to @pharap’s github.

I would like to know:

  • Who is/are the actual author(s) of file cabi.c?
  • Why does the first comment in cabi.c say abe.c instead of cabi.c?
  • Does the originally included CC0 licence refer to the code, or the RLE encoding technique by Zep, or both?
  • Who was involved in, and aware of, the licence change from CC0 to MIT?

You could just refer @JO3RI to this topic, starting here:

(Or he could review the entire topic if he’s interested in how the demise of Team A.R.G. is affecting the Arduboy community.)

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In fairness it’s the sudden disappearance of the GitHub organisation that caused the real chaos.

People come and go, but they’re remembered by the games they leave behind.
When the games themselves start vanishing, the only result can be havoc.


Hang on, didn’t his Twitter account go up in smoke too?

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I get a “This account doesn’t exist” message.

His email address given in the git logs is
info@JO3RI.be

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That’s what I expected.
I recall checking it back when this thread started and getting the same message.

I expect that site’s also been shut down.
That said, while I certainly can’t reach the site itself,
not serving HTTP/HTTPS traffic doesn’t necessarily imply that the email server isn’t still running.

One of the reasons I think Zep would be a better (for want of a better word) target for questioning is that he’s quite obviously still active on Twitter (and presumably other places).

Grabbing his attention might be difficult though.
I expect being the creator of PICO-8 means he has a lot of people vying for his attention.
“Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.”

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